Collections

Frontlet

Significance 

The frontlet was made by the Tlingit or Tsimshian people on the Pacific Northwest Coast. It is a memento of the earliest encounter between First Nations and Europeans at the site of Vancouver. In 1792, Captain George Vancouver sailed into what is now known as Burrard Inlet. Vancouver had journeyed to the Pacific to search for the Northwest Passage and to establish British rights of access to the northwest coast of America. The frontlet was collected on that voyage by Thomas Dobson, a midshipman on Captain Vancouver’s ship, HMS Discovery. Dobson served as Spanish interpreter during Vancouver’s negotiations with Juan Francisco de la Bodega y Quadra at Friendly Cove on the west coast of Vancouver Island.

 

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Supporting Sponsor - First Nations Collection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Date Range 
1700s
Artist 
Tlingit or Tsimshian
Place of Manufacture 
Collected on the northwest coast by Thomas Dobson, 1792
Dimensions 
14 cm high, 7 cm wide
Museum Location 
Storage
Catalog Number 
AA 2428
Donor 
Museum purchase, 1984 Purchase made possible by a contribution from the Government of Canada under the terms of the Cultural Property Export and Import Act