Exhibitions

Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15

Thursday, October 8, 2015 to Sunday, December 13, 2015

This exhibition marks the 15th anniversary of the founding of Canada’s newest territory, Nunavut, in 1999, and its rapid rise.

Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 surveys a century of arctic architecture, an urbanizing present, and a projected near future of adaptive architecture in Nunavut. Each of these components documents architectural history in this remarkable but relatively little known region of Canada, describes the contemporary realities of life in its communities, and examines an adapting role for architecture moving forward.

The exhibition environment is comprised of three integrated elements: (1) soapstone carvings of little-known, but significant works of architecture, (2) topographic models and photographs of each of the 25 communities in Nunavut, and (3) a series of 15 architecture models with integrated animations projecting a 15-year vision for addressing current challenges in access and delivery of housing, health, arts, education, and recreation.

Carvings were completed in January and March 2014 through a collaboration with Nunavut Arts and Crafts Association. Photography was completed in 2013-2014 in collaboration with Nick Illauq, an Inuk photographer based in Clyde River, and includes 25 original photographs from residents. Topographic models were completed through information gathered from each of the 25 hamlets, towns, and cities in Nunavut. Animated architectural models were completed through collaborations of 5 design teams made of a Nunavut-based organization, a Canadian School of Architecture, and an Architecture practice with knowledge and familiarity in working in Canada’s North.

It argues that a modern Inuit culture continues to evolve that merges the traditional and the contemporary in unique and innovative ways. Can architecture, which has largely failed this region both technically and socially, be equally innovative and adaptive?

Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 has been organized and curated by Lateral Office, with the support of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada and the Canada Council for the Arts. It is presented and coordinated by the Winnipeg Art Gallery with assistance from the Museums Assistance Program, Department of Canadian Heritage, and presenting sponsor Manulife.

Le cabinet Lateral Office a dirigé et organisé l’exposition intitulée Adaptations à l’Arctique : Nunavut à 15 ans, avec l’aide de l’Institut royal d’architecture du Canada, et du Conseil des arts du Canada. Le Musée des beaux-arts de Winnipeg se chargera de la tournée avec le soutien du Programme d’aide aux musées du ministère du Patrimoine canadien, et du commanditaire principal Manuvie.

October 08, 2015 / 5:30 PM
Curator Talk and Tour: 'Arctic Adaptations' with Lola Sheppard

Join Lola Sheppard, co-curator of Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 for an intimate talk and tour. An exhibition marking the 15th anniversary of the founding of Canada’s newest territory, visitors are invited to learn about a century of arctic architecture, an urbanizing present, and a projective near future of adaptive architecture in Nunavut.

Date: Thursday, October 8, 2015
Time: 5:30pm
Admission: Adults $14 | Seniors & Students $11 | Youth $8 | Family $38 | MOV Members Free
Tickets: In-person at the MOV front desk, or call 604-736-4431 to order by phone.

Lola Sheppard’s research exists at the intersection of architecture, landscape, and urbanism. It privileges architecture as a mutable territory that is formed out of and responsive to its history and environment. The work posits that the role of the architect is not simply that of a problem solver or designer, but also a cultural, environmental and spatial detective, bringing to light the forces at work within a site-specific climate and geography, and able to look design opportunities. Much of her recent work and teaching has focused on the role of architecture, infrastructure and the public realm in the unique and challenging context of Arctic Canada.

Lola Sheppard founded Lateral Office in 2003 with Mason White. She is also a co-editor of the journal [Bracket], which looks at the intersection of architecture, environment and digital culture. Lateral Office received the Emerging Voices award from the Architecture League of New York in 2011 and the 2010 Professional Prix de Rome award from the Canada Council for the Arts. Lola is an Associate Professor at the University of Waterloo.

Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 has been organized and curated by Lateral Office, with the support of the Royal Architectural institute of Canada and the Canada Council for the Arts. It is presented and coordinated by the Winnipeg Art Gallery with assistance from the Museums Assistance Program, department of Canadian Heritage, and presenting sponsor Manulife.

October 08, 2015 / 7:00 PM
Built City @MOV: Culture: Adaptation and Translation

In Nunavut, a place of unique indigenous values, identity, and culture coexist with newly designed environments that reflect a vision for a Canadian North that demands that architects and planners rethink how buildings and infrastructure should operate. Architect and co-curator of Arctic Adaptations Lola Sheppard and distinguished planner William Trousdale will discuss some of the professional, technical, and cultural issues of building and capacity building in Nunavut and other First Nations communities. The evening's moderator will be architect Patrick Stewart MRAIC, a member of the Nisga'a First Nation.

Date: Thursday, October 8, 2015
Time: 7:00pm
Admission: Adults $14 | Seniors & Students $11 | RAIC Members $11 | MOV Members Free
Tickets: In-person at the MOV front desk, or call 604-736-4431 to order by phone.

 

Dr. Patrick Reid Stewart is a member of the Killerwhale House of Daaxan of the Nisga’a Nation. His Nisga’a name is Luugigyoo of the Village of Gingolx. Patrick was the first architect of First Nations ancestry in B.C. to own and operate an architectural firm in B.C.  Patrick`s dissertation, indigenous architecture through indigenous knowledge: dim sagalts`apkw nisim was featured by the National Post, Vancouver Sun, Montreal Gazette, Calgary Herald, Saskatoon Star Phoenix, Regina Leader Post, Time Magazine, USA Today, gawker.com, MSN, New York Times and the Paris Review. He has two chapters from his dissertation accepted for publication in the forthcoming book, Contemporary Indigenous Architecture: Local Traditions, Global Winds from the University of New Mexico Press. His architectural work is included in the book, New Architecture on Indigenous Lands and in the award winning architectural film documentary, Aboriginal Architecture: Living Architecture. He participated in the award winning film documentary, Something to eat, a place to sleep and someone who gives a damn, a film on homelessness. Patrick is current Chair of the Provincial Aboriginal Homelessness Committee and past Chair (for 9 years) of the Aboriginal Homelessness Steering Committee for Metro Vancouver.

Lola Sheppard’s research exists at the intersection of architecture, landscape, and urbanism. It privileges architecture as a mutable territory that is formed out of and responsive to its history and environment.  The work posits that the role of the architect is not simply problem solver or designer, but cultural, environmental and spatial detective, bringing to light the forces at work within a site-specific climate and geography, and able to look design opportunities.  Much of her recent work and teaching has focused on the role of architecture, infrastructure and the public realm in the unique and challenging context of Arctic Canada.  Lola Sheppard founded Lateral Office in 2003 with Mason White. She is also a co editor of the journal [Bracket] which looks at the intersection of architecture, environment and digital culture. Lateral Office received the Emerging Voices award from the Architecture League of New York in 2011 and the 2010 Professional Prix de Rome award from the Canada Council for the Arts. Lola is an Associate Professor at the University of Waterloo.

William Trousdale is a globally recognized and awarding winning planner, economist, decision analyst and tourism expert. He is a certified professional planner in the United States and Canada. His work has also been given national recognition (two national awards for planning excellence from the Canadian Institute of planners) international recognition (three projects selected for the United Nations Best Practices Data Base) and earned fellowships from the Ford Foundation and CIDA’s Centre of Excellence. Currently he is working with aboriginal communities in Canada, international NGOs and agencies, local governments, research institutes, and the private sector. He has worked on over one-hundred assignments in countries across the Americas, Asia, Africa and eastern Europe. Much of his work has been published in academic journals.

Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 surveys a century of arctic architecture, an urbanizing present, and a projective near future of adaptive architecture in Nunavut. Each of these components documents architectural history in this remarkable but relatively little known region of Canada, describes the contemporary realities of life in its communities, and examines an adapting role for architecture moving forward. This exhibition marks the 15th anniversary of the founding of Canada’s newest territory, Nunavut, in 1999, and its rapid rise.

Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 has been organized and curated by Lateral Office, with the support of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada and the Canada Council for the Arts. It is presented and coordinated by the Winnipeg Art Gallery with assistance from the Museums Assistance Program, Department of Canadian Heritage, and presenting sponsor Manulife.

Le cabinet Lateral Office a dirigé et organisé l’exposition intitulée Adaptations à l’Arctique : Nunavut à 15 ans, avec l’aide de l’Institut royal d’architecture du Canada, et du Conseil des arts du Canada. Le Musée des beaux-arts de Winnipeg se chargera de la tournée avec le soutien du Programme d’aide aux musées du ministère du Patrimoine canadien, et du commanditaire principal Manuvie.

 

October 16, 2015 / 7:00 PM
'Arctic Defenders' Film Screening

Arctic Defenders tells the remarkable story that began in 1968 with a radical Inuit movement in Canada. It led to the largest land claim in western civilization, orchestrated by young visionary Inuit with a dream - the governance of their territory - the creation of Nunavut. The story reveals the dark side of Canada’s attempt at sovereignty in the north and finds hope and inspiration from determined Inuit who changed the rules of the game. It's also an incredibly personal film, as it charts Walker’s return to the High Arctic which he first explored as a wide-eyed teenager.

Presenting partner: DOXA.

Date: Friday, October 16, 2015
Time: 7:00pm

Admission: Adults $14 | Seniors & Students $11 | Youth $8 | Family $38 | Wheelchair Accessible $11 | MOV Members Free
Tickets: Register now!

AND

Date: Sunday, October 18, 2015 CANCELLED

Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 surveys a century of arctic architecture, an urbanizing present, and a projective near future of adaptive architecture in Nunavut. Each of these components documents architectural history in this remarkable but relatively little known region of Canada, describes the contemporary realities of life in its communities, and examines an adapting role for architecture moving forward. This exhibition marks the 15th anniversary of the founding of Canada’s newest territory, Nunavut, in 1999, and its rapid rise.

Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 has been organized and curated by Lateral Office, with the support of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada and the Canada Council for the Arts. It is presented and coordinated by the Winnipeg Art Gallery with assistance from the Museums Assistance Program, Department of Canadian Heritage, and presenting sponsor Manulife.

Le cabinet Lateral Office a dirigé et organisé l’exposition intitulée Adaptations à l’Arctique : Nunavut à 15 ans, avec l’aide de l’Institut royal d’architecture du Canada, et du Conseil des arts du Canada. Le Musée des beaux-arts de Winnipeg se chargera de la tournée avec le soutien du Programme d’aide aux musées du ministère du Patrimoine canadien, et du commanditaire principal Manuvie.

October 18, 2015 / 2:00 PM
'Arctic Defenders' Film Screening - cancelled

This screening has been cancelled.

November 12, 2015 / 7:00 PM
Talk and Learn: Arctic Adaptations, Housing, and Inuit Social History

Frank Tester, Professor School of Social Work at the University of British Columbia, will be hosting a talk in conjunction with Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 exhibition.  Frank has lived and worked extensively in the Eastern Arctic. His comprehensive research explores the social implications of living conditions related to public housing policies in Arctic communities.  Frank’s research, both provocative and revealing, points to a public housing system that is informed by cost saving measures and, in some cases, problematic architectural design. Issues of overcrowding and lack of basic resources are but a few of the issues that prompt Frank to build a case for a Social Housing model.

A key aim of Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15  is to explore the potential for adaptive architecture in addressing current challenges in Nunavut around access and delivery of housing, health, arts, education, and recreation. University of British Columbia social work professor Frank Tester will share in-depth insights and research findings connected to these challenges, particularly around the hurdles and needs inherent in providing housing in a demanding physical environment, and  complex ideological and historical context. To learn more about "the Implications of Homelessness for Inuit," read Tester's report (PDF).

Date: Thursday, November 12, 2015
Time: 7:00pm
Admission: Adults $14 | Seniors & Students $11 | Youth $8 | Family $38 | MOV Members Free

Tickets: Register now!

Frank Tester is Professor of Social Work at UBC. He previously taught in the Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University, Toronto. He has a particular interest in social and environmental issues in relation to colonial histories. Frank has lived and worked extensively in the eastern Arctic. His current research interests include Inuit social history, the problem of young Inuit suicide and the social and personal implications of a severe housing shortage and overcrowding. His most recent contribution is research and a far-reaching report on the impacts of the Meadowbank Gold Mine on women and families in the community of Qammani’tuaq (Baker Lake), Nunavut. He is also working with Inuit youth and Elders in Naujaat and Gjoa Haven, helping them to discover, research, write about, and film their social history and culture. Frank has researched the history of Inuit residential schools, is a documentary film maker and has been a research advisor to the Qikiqtani Truth Commission.

Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 surveys a century of arctic architecture, an urbanizing present, and a projective near future of adaptive architecture in Nunavut. Each of these components documents architectural history in this remarkable but relatively little known region of Canada, describes the contemporary realities of life in its communities, and examines an adapting role for architecture moving forward. This exhibition marks the 15th anniversary of the founding of Canada’s newest territory, Nunavut, in 1999, and its rapid rise.

Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 has been organized and curated by Lateral Office, with the support of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada and the Canada Council for the Arts. It is presented and coordinated by the Winnipeg Art Gallery with assistance from the Museums Assistance Program, Department of Canadian Heritage, and presenting sponsor Manulife.

Le cabinet Lateral Office a dirigé et organisé l’exposition intitulée Adaptations à l’Arctique : Nunavut à 15 ans, avec l’aide de l’Institut royal d’architecture du Canada, et du Conseil des arts du Canada. Le Musée des beaux-arts de Winnipeg se chargera de la tournée avec le soutien du Programme d’aide aux musées du ministère du Patrimoine canadien, et du commanditaire principal Manuvie.

November 26, 2015 / 7:00 PM
Life In A Changing Arctic: Talk and Learn with Eric Solomon

Eric Solomon, Director of Arctic Programs at the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre, will present 'Life In A Changing Arctic,' an interactive talk highlighting life in Canada’s Arctic communities, their strong connection to the land and the rapid changes they are experiencing. Eric will speak about his experiences working in the Arctic, economic issues, the significance of the changing sea ice that connects Arctic communities, and the opportunities and challenges brought by an increasingly accessible Arctic ocean. Eric leads the Vancouver Aquarium’s Arctic research, conservation and education initiatives, and works with Arctic aboriginal communities, researchers, policy-makers, educators and the general public to improve knowledge and dialogue on this important region. Eric is an expert on integrated approaches to building and communicating scientific and locally-derived knowledge about the Arctic and its regional issues.

Event date: November 26, 7:00pm

Admission: By Donation

November 27, 2015 / 7:00 PM
'People of a Feather' Documentary Film Screening

Featuring stunning footage from seven winters in the Arctic, People of a Feather takes you through time into the world of the Inuit on the Belcher Islands in Canada's Hudson Bay. Connecting past, present and future is a unique relationship with the eider duck. Eider down, the warmest feather in the world, allows both Inuit and bird to survive harsh Arctic winters.

Date: Friday, November 27, 2015
Time: 7:00pm (90 minutes)
Admission: Includes admission to Arctic Adaptations exhibition. Adults $14 | Seniors & Students $11 | Youth $8 | Family $38 | Wheelchair Accessible $11 | MOV Members Free
Tickets: 
Register now!

Presenting partner: DOXA.

Traditional life is juxtaposed with modern challenges as both Inuit and eiders confront changing sea ice and ocean currents disrupted by the massive hydroelectric dams powering New York and eastern North America. Inspired by Inuit ingenuity and the technology of a simple feather, the film is a call to action to implement energy solutions that work with nature.

 
Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 surveys a century of arctic architecture, an urbanizing present, and a projective near future of adaptive architecture in Nunavut. Each of these components documents architectural history in this remarkable but relatively little known region of Canada, describes the contemporary realities of life in its communities, and examines an adapting role for architecture moving forward. This exhibition marks the 15th anniversary of the founding of Canada’s newest territory, Nunavut, in 1999, and its rapid rise.

Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 has been organized and curated by Lateral Office, with the support of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada and the Canada Council for the Arts. It is presented and coordinated by the Winnipeg Art Gallery with assistance from the Museums Assistance Program, Department of Canadian Heritage, and presenting sponsor Manulife.

Le cabinet Lateral Office a dirigé et organisé l’exposition intitulée Adaptations à l’Arctique : Nunavut à 15 ans, avec l’aide de l’Institut royal d’architecture du Canada, et du Conseil des arts du Canada. Le Musée des beaux-arts de Winnipeg se chargera de la tournée avec le soutien du Programme d’aide aux musées du ministère du Patrimoine canadien, et du commanditaire principal Manuvie.

 
December 03, 2015 / 7:00 PM
Talk and Learn: Evolution and Adaptations in Modern Inuit Culture

An interdisciplinary talk that delves into the contemporary life in Canadian Inuit communities. Ecologist/filmmaker Joel Heath and anthropologist Pamela Stern will share insights from their research and experience in the Arctic, and prompt us to consider what it is like to live surrounded by the harsh climate and stark landscapes of the Arctic tundra. Drawing from 15 years conducting Arctic research and his experience producing the award-winning film People of a Feather, Heath’s talk will provide a unique glimpse into the evolution of Arctic culture, and how environmental change - particularly in relation to hydroelectric projects – has changed the Inuit people of Sanikiluag’s relationship to their ecosystem. Stern’s talk “The Art of Home” will explore Inuit art, specifically representations of homes, both past and present. Two prolific printmaking Inuit communities, Ulukhaktok (Holman) and Cape Dorset will be covered.

Date: Thursday, December 3, 2015
Time: 7:00pm
Admission: Adults $14 | Seniors & Students $11 | Youth $8 | Family $38 | MOV Members Free
Tickets: Register now!

 

Joel Heath is a scientist, award winning filmmaker, environmental activist, and recently held the prestigious 2014-15 Canada Fulbright Chair in Arctic Studies at the University of Washington. In 2002, Joel began his PhD project: to study the winter ecology of eider ducks in the Canadian Arctic. This project took him to the remote Belcher Islands where he worked with the community of Sanikiluaq to gather data and footage of the ducks and arctic sea ice. His PhD completed, Joel moved onto a bigger project: sharing the story behind the research by creating a beautiful and intelligent documentary about the relationships among changing sea ice, eider ducks, and the unique Inuit of Sanikiluaq that use the birds for clothing and food. People of a Feather has won over 16 international film awards.  In addition to Research Associate positions at Carleton University (Geography and Environmental Studies) and the University of Manitoba (Centre for Earth Observation Science), Joel is the Executive Director and founder of the Arctic Eider Society, a registered charity that supports outreach, research, and solution-oriented activism with the goal of empowering Inuit and Cree communities, providing environmental stewardship for sea ice ecosystems. The Society also works to engage youth and bring the voices of Inuit to discussions on important environmental issues.

Pamela Stern is assistant professor of anthropology at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada. Dr. Stern is the author of two books about Inuit: Historical Dictionary of the Inuit and Daily Life of Inuit and is co-editor of Critical Inuit Studies: An Anthology of Contemporary Arctic Ethnography.  She is also the co-author of The Proposal Economy, an ethnography about citizenship in a northern Ontario community. Stern is a socio-cultural anthropologist with interests in the ways that individuals and communities respond to and shape the conditions of modern life and in doing so participate in making public policy. She has conducted ethnographic fieldwork in Ulukhaktok, an Inuvialuit community in the Northwest Territories, as well as in Cobalt, Ontario.

Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 surveys a century of arctic architecture, an urbanizing present, and a projective near future of adaptive architecture in Nunavut. Each of these components documents architectural history in this remarkable but relatively little known region of Canada, describes the contemporary realities of life in its communities, and examines an adapting role for architecture moving forward. This exhibition marks the 15th anniversary of the founding of Canada’s newest territory, Nunavut, in 1999, and its rapid rise.

Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 has been organized and curated by Lateral Office, with the support of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada and the Canada Council for the Arts. It is presented and coordinated by the Winnipeg Art Gallery with assistance from the Museums Assistance Program, Department of Canadian Heritage, and presenting sponsor Manulife.

Le cabinet Lateral Office a dirigé et organisé l’exposition intitulée Adaptations à l’Arctique : Nunavut à 15 ans, avec l’aide de l’Institut royal d’architecture du Canada, et du Conseil des arts du Canada. Le Musée des beaux-arts de Winnipeg se chargera de la tournée avec le soutien du Programme d’aide aux musées du ministère du Patrimoine canadien, et du commanditaire principal Manuvie.

September 15, 2015 / 12:14 PM
Vancouver Premiere of Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15

Architectural history of Canada’s newest territory presented at Museum of Vancouver

VANCOUVER, BC – From the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) comes the Vancouver premiere of Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15, commemorating the establishment of Canada’s newest, largest and most northerly territory. This investigation into the architectural history of Nunavut is on display October 8 – December 13, 2015.

The exhibition, which is organized and curated by Lateral Office, was originally shown in 2014 at the 14th International Architecture Exhibition - la Biennale di Venezia. It is presented and coordinated by the Winnipeg Art Gallery with assistance from the Museums Assistance Program, department of Canadian Heritage, and presenting sponsor Manulife.

Visitors will delve into the realities of contemporary life in this sublime yet fragile region, exploring philosophies of adaptation, ingenuity, and the intersection of technology and tradition. Concepts will be illuminated through soapstone carvings of significant architectural works, topographic models and photographs of Nunavut’s 25 communities, and replicas of structures enhanced by animations which suggest innovative solutions in the delivery of housing, health, arts, education, and recreation.

Arctic Adaptations surveys a recent architectural past, a current urbanizing present, and a projected near future of adaptive architecture in Nunavut. Today, there are almost 33,000 people living across two million square kilometres, making Nunavut one of the least densely populated regions in the world. These communities, located above the tree line and with no roads connecting them, range in population from 120 in the smallest hamlet to 7,000 in Nunavut’s capital city of Iqaluit. The climate, geography, and people of Nunavut, as well as the wider Canadian Arctic, challenge the viability of a universalizing modernity.

Following the age of polar exploration in the 20th century, modern architecture encroached on this remote and vast region of Canada in the name of sovereignty, aboriginal affairs management, or trade, among others. Throughout the last 100 years, architecture, infrastructure, and settlements have been the tools for these acts. People have been re-located; trading posts, military infrastructure, and research stations have been built; and small settlements are now emerging as Arctic cities. Some have described this rapid confrontation with modernity as a transition “from igloos to internet” compressed into forty years. This abruptness has revealed powerful traits among its people—adaptation and resilience—qualities which modern architecture has often lacked. Few places exemplify the ability to adapt in the face of modernity better than Nunavut.

Coinciding with the 15th anniversary of the establishment of the territory, which changed Canada’s map, Arctic Adaptations explores modernism’s legacy within the contextual particularities of the North. The exhibition documents architectural history in this remarkable but relatively unknown region of Canada, describes the contemporary realities of life in its communities, and examines a projected role for architecture moving forward. It argues that modern Inuit cultures continue to evolve and merge the traditional and the contemporary in unique and innovative ways, and questions whether architecture, which has largely failed this region—both technically and socially—can be equally innovative and adaptive.

Modernity is often fearful of the specificities of place and the premise of ‘the local’. Yet Nunavut seems to resist modernism’s universalizing tendency. This unique exhibition seeks to reveal acts of architectural resistance and identify an unrecognized modern Canadian North.

Media are invited to an exclusive curator tour of Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15, with Lola Sheppard, on Wednesday, October 7 at 2:30pm. Phone interviews can also be arranged in advance.

 

Credits

Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 has been organized and curated by Lateral Office, with the support of the Royal Architectural institute of Canada and the Canada Council for the Arts.  It is presented and coordinated by the Winnipeg Art Gallery with assistance for the Museums Assistance Program, department of Canadian Heritage, and presenting sponsor Manulife.

 

About Museum of Vancouver (museumofvancouver.ca)

The Museum of Vancouver (MOV) is an award-winning authority on Vancouver’s history, sharing the region’s stories from its Aboriginal beginnings to contemporary topics. It creates engaging exhibitions and programs that encourage dialogue about what was, is, and can-be Vancouver, serving as a gathering place that connects Vancouverites to each other, and Vancouver to the world.  

 

LISTING INFORMATION                Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15

Date:                                                October 8 – December 13, 2015

Venue:                                              Museum of Vancouver, 1100 Chestnut Street, Vancouver, BC

Website:                                          museumofvancouver.ca

Images:                                           High-resolution images are available to download at: arcticadaptations.ca/press

 

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For further media information, contact

Myles Constable, Marketing Officer, Museum of Vancouver

604.730.5309 | mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca