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Posted by: Myles Constable on June 21, 2016 at 4:53 pm

The following data visualization films were created by Andy Yan as part of the Your Future Home: Creating the New Vancouver exhibition at the Museum of Vancouver.

The videos provide statistical context to each of the exhibition's four themes: public space, housing affordability, residential density, and transportation in the City of Vancouver.

The Land and Public Space

These data visualizations and maps on the land characteristics, history of settlement patterns, and public space in the City of Vancouver.

Residential Density

These data visualizations and maps on residential density, population demographics, and land use zoning in the City of Vancouver.

Housing Affordability

These data visualizations and maps on housing affordability, housing types, and building age in the City of Vancouver.

Transportation and Transportation Networks

These data visualizations and maps on transportation and transportation networks in the City of Vancouver

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Posted by: Angela Yen on June 10, 2016 at 4:52 pm


On June 2, 2016 we concluded our 30th Anniversary Expo ’86 celebration with a fun night centred on Expo’s main theme of transportation. With a bike valet readily available outside the museum, we encouraged our guests to bike down to the event in spirit of Bike to Work Week and of course the theme of the night.

We had music sets from Bali styled troupe, Gamelan Bike Bike, who incredibly, play instruments that are made out of discarded bike parts. After Happy Hour and Gamelan Bike Bike’s first set, the event proceeded with three special presentations from architecture and design experts Henry Tsang, Alana Green and Jenni Pace. The evening was hosted by Westender writer/ CBC personality Grant Lawrence who - along with the panel - shared his personal experiences of Expo ’86.


From left to right: Grant Lawrence, Alana Green, Jenni Pace and Henry Tsang

Henry Tsang - who actually worked at Expo fresh out of graduating from post-secondary - shared his initial impressions and the history of how the False Creek area developed after the major event. Tsang, whose media installations have been exhibited internationally, shared his interactive mapping project, “Maraya” (meaning “mirrors” in Arabic) which drew interesting design parallels between False Creek/Seawall and Dubai’s waterfronts and walkways.

Alana Green - who was only six when Expo ’86 happened - began her presentation by pointing out the appreciation of Expo’s design from a child’s perspective, noting its vibrant colours, whimsical shapes and sheer comical scale of objects like the Swiss Swatch Watch display. To this day, Green contemplates if this early introduction to these particular design aesthetics has influenced her design approach as an adult.

Originally from Alabama, seasoned architectural historian Jenni Pace, had no direct link to Expo ’86. However, as an outsider looking in, she shared how this gave her a unique view and exploration of the design and transportation themes of Expo. Her research concluded that the massive “Highway ‘86” sculpture/art installation which stretched 217m long was the major highlight for most people who attended. She deconstructed the sculpture’s post-apocalyptic and brutalist design and presented its possible connections to other sculptures and buildings around the world.

The night couldn’t have been completed without one more dazzling set from Gamelan Bike Bike. Michael Trenzer, a composer and Gamelan music aficionado, introduced the group and spoke about the beloved Indonesian music and how Expo ’86 actually hosted the first International Gamelan Festival. As the bike bars and gears clanked and clinked away, everyone sipped their last drops of beer, now full of knowledge on all things Expo ’86.

Big thanks to the presenters, Grant Lawrence, Gamelan Bike Bike and to our supporting partners at Westender, The Bicycle Valet, HUB and Red Truck Beer Company.

To see more photos from the event visit: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10153491358226433.1073741885.9...

 

Posted by: Angela Yen on June 1, 2016 at 1:00 pm

May 19, 2016 the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) continued to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Expo ’86 inviting the city to recollect the days of big hair, synths, neon fanny packs and the biggest public event in BC’s history. The evening began with drinks and snacks while guests mingled and checked out the display cases of retro artifacts and archive footage.

Followed was a special presentation featuring four architects and designers who contributed to Expo ’86. The talk was hosted by landscape architect Margot Long, who first introduced Bruno Freschi, the Chief Architect and famously known for designing the Telus World of Science, or better known to locals as, Science World. Other presenters included Alan Hart, key developer of the Expo Line/SKYTRAIN, Clive Grout, designer behind the corporate pavilions such as General Motors and Plaza of Nations, and Peter Cardew, contributor to Expo Gate and the CN Pavillion.

An ongoing mention was the scale and just how many people came together to make it happen. Expo ‘86 put Vancouver on the map and pushed the city forward in terms of urban and transportation development. The event provided thousands of jobs to designers, architects and exhibitioners across the country and helped launch the careers of budding designers such as Long, who like many contributors to the Expo made the move to Vancouver from Calgary and other neighbouring cities. To this day, Expo ‘86 remains the most recent World’s Fair to be held in North America.


From left to right: Bruno Freschi, Peter Cardew, Alan Hart, Margot Long and Clive Grout.

To see more photos from this event, please visit this gallery.

Posted by: Myles Constable on April 22, 2016 at 12:31 pm

The Museum of Vancouver is honoured to have been chosen by the readers of the Vancouver Courier as a top destination in the Art Gallery/Museums category for Stars of Vancouver 2016.

Read an interview with our Collections Associate Jillian Povarchook, and discover her choices for best of Vancouver!

 

Posted by: Myles Constable on March 17, 2016 at 11:59 am

This workshop series invites participants to explore the wider issues and challenges in Vancouver through a design lens.

Sunday afternoons (2:30-5:00pm) throughout April, the Museum will curate a series of playful explorations and thoughtful workshops in conjunction with the Your Future Home exhibition and its central themes: Affordability, Density, Mobility and Public Space. Each workshop session can be experienced as a standalone event, or participate in all of them for maximum engagement!

 

April 3: Modify Vancouver: An Introduction to Design Fiction

Hosted by the Vancouver Design Nerds, this workship will introduce participants to Design Fiction through the research of guest speaker Ian Wojtowicz. It will spark creativity, collaboration and a methods for generating conceptual ideas as they pertain to local issues around Vancouver’s mobility and public space.

Participants will work in small groups to put theory into action, re-imagining a Vancouver without any limits. Designers use the practice of Design Fiction to propose and provoke discussion about what is and what could be, to produce projects that sit between the plausible and imaginary. This is a unique technique that takes a speculative approach to creative work; think science fiction for the present! Join the Design Nerds and use your creative imagination to design near future realities around such areas as public transportation and public space.

Workshop leaders and registration info.

 

April 10: Dear Vancouver: An Experimental Letter Writing Campaign on Public Space

This workshop invites participants to brainstorm and create a new and experimental campaign for communicating with, through and across the city of Vancouver. Workshop coordinators - Justin Langlois and Alicia Medina Laddaga - will lead participants through creative forms of writing to synthesize letters that will be documented and subsequently distributed though post and/or online.

Letter writing campaigns have long been the first line of action by citizens asking for change in their communities. Whether writing to city hall, letters to the editor, or even posters in public places, the ways in which we address our city and one another goes a long way in shaping how we think about and live within Vancouver. Dear Vancouver workshop will implement collective letter drafting of enthusiastic praise, important demands, and open-ended questions to get to know where we live, and how we live in Vancouver. No experience in letter writing is necessary. Non-English speaking community members are highly encouraged to attend.

Workshop leaders and registration info.

 

April 17: Make It Rain

This workshop, facilitated by members of The Vancouver Public Space Network (VPSN), explores the concept of making public spaces in rainy climates usable and enjoyable all year round. Participants will review and discuss precedent studies, followed by a “live” analysis of remote video feeds from around the city of Vancouver. In an effort to work through solutions for more rain friendly city spaces, participants will be asked, ‘what are the impacts of a predominantly rainy climate on the design of public spaces?’

This workshop will develop materials and documentation that will be used as a basis for advocacy and education directed towards making Vancouver’s public spaces better adapted for the rainy months. After participating in the Make it Rain workshop you will be inspired to connect and celebrate one of Vancouver’s most overlooked assets: the rain.

Workshop leaders and registration info.

 

April 24: Improv-ing the City. Designing Policies through Participative Theatre

Alec Balasescu and Jonathan Bleackley of Civic Renewal Lab host a role-playing and improv workshop that will explore Vancouver’s development, housing, and affordability policies. Guided by the question, "for whom is the city built?" and borrowing from similar policy-based theatre work, participants will be led in acting out the impact of key housing policies and policy questions, with an interest towards helping residents understand the stakes, opinions and goals of the various players involved, and why finding solutions can be difficult.

Actors will be assigned diverse roles such as homeowner, renter, real estate agent, foreign investor, contractor banker. They will be provided with a current or proposed policy and be asked to act out the implications of that policy. The eventual goal of Improv-ing the City is to help participants better understand the complexity of the issues, what is causing the real estate crisis, and identify what policy changes Vancouver could adopt moving forward to address the problem.

This event has been canceled but may be rescheduled in the future.

Posted by: Myles Constable on January 18, 2016 at 12:59 pm

Andy Yan discusses the City's future and the Your Future Home exhibition on CBC's Our Vancouver with Gloria Macarenko.

Gregory Dreicer and Richard Henriquez discuss Your Future Home on Global News.

Cover story from The WestEnder: The Museum of Vancouver’s newest exhibition looks to empower residents to shape their city’s future.

The Museum of Vancouver’s newest exhibition looks to empower residents to shape their city’s future - See more at: http://www.westender.com/news-issues/news/imagining-vancouver-s-future-1...
The Museum of Vancouver’s newest exhibition looks to empower residents to shape their city’s future - See more at: http://www.westender.com/news-issues/news/imagining-vancouver-s-future-1...

Listen to Sense of Place on Roundhouse Radio: Gregory Dreicer and Al Etamanski: January 18

Listen to Sense of Place on Roundhouse Radio: Gregory Dreicer and Andy Yan: January 25

Listen to Sense of Place on Roundhouse Radio: Bruce Haden with Dwayne Smith and Colin Harper: February 1

Listen to Sense of Place on Roundhouse Radio: Bruce Haden with Kari Dow and Ian MacDonald: February 15

Listen to Sense of Place on Roundhouse Radio: Bruce Haden with Kelty McKinnon and Melissa Higgs: February 22

Listen to Sense of Place on Roundhouse Radio: Bruce Haden, Kim Glauber, and Sean McEwen discuss Housing Affordibility: February 29

Museum of Vancouver exhibit looks to the future, via Vancouver Courier

"Your Future Home lets you visualize how this city’s future might look, instead of just reading about it. In fact, the exhibit looks like it might be so aesthetically pleasing, interactive, and entertaining that you might stop worrying—for an hour or two, anyway—about how you’re ever going to afford a home in this town." - via Georgia Straight exhibition review and photo gallery.

Your Future Home statistics curator Andy Yan declares 91% of Vancouver homes valued at more than 1 million dollars, via Global News.

Maike Evers from City Lights on Novus TV explores the Your Future Home exhibiiton.

Gregory Dreicer previews Your Future Home on Shaw Around Town.

"An ambitious new exhibition, currently on display at the Museum of Vancouver, is turning heads and spurring heated discussions about pressing topics." Your Future Home in Your Future City by Canadian Architect.

Podcast with Scalena Real Estate's Adam and Matt. Listen here.

Posted by: Rachel Roy on October 27, 2015 at 11:50 am

Input from Aboriginal community members is integral to the process of creating usable and culturally meaningful built spaces for people in their daily lives.

At MOV’s Built City Talk on October 8, architects Lola Sheppard, Luugigyoo Patrick Reid Stewart, and city planner and analyst William Trousdale provided insightful thoughts on their work with aboriginal communities. Most revealing were their ideas on how architecture has a lot to learn from the communities they serve.  Lola and William spoke humbly of careful listening and looking that needs to take place. This involves adapting and translating the ideas discussed with aboriginal communities into built form. Central to their discussion was thinking about how people will use buildings over a season, and the best positioning for building entrances and overall structures on the land.

 

 

Lola acknowledged that the history of Nunavut is immersed in colonialism which can be visibly seen in the southern architecture of the buildings—she emphasizes that this was not nearly as dynamic as the culture it was trying to serve.

Lola reinforced this point with a powerful message voiced by Sheila Watt-Cloutier from The Right to be Cold (2006):

“We are an adaptable people. We’ve had to be. We’ve weathered this storm of modernization fairly well - going from dog teams to snowmobiles, and flying jumbo jets and going from igloo huts to permanent homes, and of course, going from our environment - which is our supermarket - to now having supermarket-like stores in communities - all within a few decades. This has not been without consequences.”

 

 

As Patrick explained, the federal government tried to impose Canadian culture and buildings on the landscape. This is evident in the southern style architecture that still dominates many parts of Nunavut.

 

 

As an architect who is proudly representing his aboriginal heritage, Patrick sees indigenous cultural practices, such as basket weaving, as inspirational concepts for architects building for and with First Nations communities as it speaks to their identity. Patrick is an architect who acts as a facilitator and designs with and for aboriginal communities.

Similarly, Lola engages in careful listening and learning about the land with communities, and views this as crucial for developing new architectural structures for people in Nunavut.

Lola views the Inuit culture as incredibly dynamic – people in Nunavut are living in a radically changing region climatically, economically, and culturally. For instance, youth learn how to hunt with their elders, as well as engage online using social media tools and technology to create and share their own hip-hop music. Lola suggests that this forms part of an emerging urbanism in Nunavut, and she continues to contemplate the future role of architecture in this.

 

 

Lola poses this intriguing question: Can architecture be used as a tool of empowerment for aboriginal communities in the Arctic? Through a project she worked on with students, Nunavut-based organizations, Inuit community members, local artists, and architects based in the north, future spaces are imagined for Nunavut cities and towns to try and address their daily needs.

MOV invites you to come explore architecture’s future role for Nunavut in Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 until December 13th, 2015.


Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 has been organized and curated by Lateral Office, with the support of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada and the Canada Council for the Arts. It is presented and coordinated by the Winnipeg Art Gallery with assistance from the Museums Assistance Program, Department of Canadian Heritage, and presenting sponsor Manulife.

Le cabinet Lateral Office a dirigé et organisé l’exposition intitulée Adaptations à l’Arctique : Nunavut à 15 ans, avec l’aide de l’Institut royal d’architecture du Canada, et du Conseil des arts du Canada. Le Musée des beaux-arts de Winnipeg se chargera de la tournée avec le soutien du Programme d’aide aux musées du ministère du Patrimoine canadien, et du commanditaire principal Manuvie.

 

Posted by: Myles Constable on October 16, 2015 at 4:44 pm

Today was a very special day for the team that created c̓əsnaʔəm, The City Before the City. The collaborative series of exhibitions was recognized at Rideau Hall in Ottawa, where the curators were presented with  the 2015 Governor General’s History Award for Excellence in Museums, by His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston.

The award recognizes individuals or institutions that have made remarkable contributions to a better knowledge of Canadian history. This year’s winning project is c̓əsnaʔəm, The City Before the City. The exhibition tells the story of c̓əsnaʔəm, one of the largest ancient Musqueam villages and burial sites upon which Vancouver was built. It was jointly curated by the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) in collaboration with the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at UBC, Musqueam First Nation, and Susan Roy from the University of Waterloo.

“Winning such a prestigious national award is a testament to the hard work, creativity and perseverance of the curatorial teams,” says Nancy Noble, CEO of MOV. “This important exhibition has allowed the Museum to confront its own colonial past, acknowledging the actions of our predecessors and hopefully, in some small way, reconciling the many misconceptions about the Musqueam people, their history and their continued contributions to Vancouver and Canadian society.”

The three-location exhibition intends to generate public discussion about indigenous history, and to raise awareness of the significance of c̓əsnaʔəm for the Musqueam people and for Vancouver. The ancient village of c̓əsnaʔəm was founded about 5,000 years ago at what was then the mouth of the Fraser—the southern border of today’s Marpole neighbourhood.

“c̓əsnaʔəm was a place where families lived and put their people to rest and was a sophisticated society. That’s why the exhibit is called ‘The City Before the City,’ says Jordan Wilson of the MOA and co-curator of the exhibition. “All too often there’s a picture painted of these villages as quite small and primitive, but in fact it was quite a large site, and the Musqueam people played a significant role in shaping the City of Vancouver.”

“Museums are no longer just passive buildings that store old objects. They play an active role in sharing new knowledge,” says Janet Walker, President and CEO of Canada’s History Society, which administers the award. “c̓əsnaʔəm, The City Before the City is a perfect example of how a museum exhibition can counter an existing narrative—that Vancouver is a young city of immigrants—and replace it with a more truthful version of events. In this way, museums help shape our future as well as our past.”

The joint exhibition opened earlier this year at the Museum of Vancouver, the Museum of Anthropology and the Musqueam Cultural Centre, and continues through January 2016. Each location explores different aspects of c̓əsnaʔəm, through artifacts—collected mainly in the 1920s and ‘30s—and new technologies such as 3-D printing.

You can find more information about the exhibition at www.thecitybeforethecity.com.

Posted by: Myles Constable on September 4, 2015 at 3:58 pm

Since April 23, more than 30,000 visitors to the Museum of Vancouver have had the exciting and astonishing experience of seeing Stefan Sagmeister: The Happy Show in person (a few people didn't actually like it).

With all those visitors, came crazy numbers of social media posts. Thousands of pictures - of gumballs, yellow walls, a giant monkey, digital spider webs, and people riding the stationary bike with a huge neon sign - have filled the people we follow's feeds.

Check out a sampling of those shots below...

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